The changing landscape of memory care


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Projected demographics indicate that memory care is about to become a booming market of opportunity for facilities and their construction that tend to developing specialized memory care needs. While some facilities are stand-alone solutions for memory care patients, others will offer care that is already integrated into existing facilities that cover more than just the memory care sector. Lisa McCracken, senior vice president of senior living research and development at Ziegler says "With the projected increases in individuals who have cognitive impairments, and the decreasing number of caregivers, we do not expect that this pattern will go away anytime soon."

 

Some of the fundamental changes include inventive care settings that are vastly different than existing dementia support floors and secure units. Some of the care settings have not yet been realized as research and understanding of cognitive impairment continues forward. The fact is there will be a broader array of options to choose from in the near future. The "small house" model is becoming increasingly popular. The small house model is an intimate setting within existing nursing communities consisting of 10 enclosed, secure units and is designed for couples facing memory challenges. A small scale affordable housing model partially funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is typically available to low-income seniors.

 

Those seniors who can afford private pay for their memory care are being aided by assisted living facilities that design dementia care units like a neighborhood from an earlier time in the patient’s life. Often, dementia patients readily recall memories from long ago and these centers, designed to look like a community, are replete with porches, rocking chairs, carpet that mimics grass, and a fiber optic ceiling that allows transitional lighting creating a sense of the day and night sky. Other elements like aromatherapy can aide in calming residents or stimulating appetite depending on the selection of oils integrated into the therapy. All of these elements help reduce anger, anxiety, and depression which are hallmarks of seniors who suffer from dementia illnesses.

By David Disponett on 04/15/2019 1:00 PM
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