News

Why You Should Use a Lawyer for Medicaid Planning

Many seniors and their families don't use a lawyer to plan for long-term care or Medicaid, often because they're afraid of the cost. But an attorney can help you save money in the long run as well as make sure you are getting the best care for your loved one.

The Current State of the Affordable Care Act

The Republican Party appears to be sending differing signals following the collapse of Senate GOP efforts to overhaul the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the healthcare law better known as Obamacare. Although defeated, there is consensus within the party and even in Democratic camps, that there are numerous problems with the ACA. In a series of tweets, President Donald Trump has, in recent days, ramped up calls for the Senate to vote on healthcare before considering any other legislation. The latest rumblings seem to indicate that there is a possibility the Administration will consider eliminating the insurer subsidies provided under the ACA thereby resulting in staggering increases in average health insurance premiums of at least 20%.

Take These Three Steps When Your Child Turns 18

If your child has reached the teenage years, you may already feel as though you are losing control of her life. This is legally true once your child reaches the age of 18 because then the state considers your child to be an adult with the legal right to govern his or her own life.

Annuities and Medicaid Planning

Immediate annuities can be ideal Medicaid planning tools for spouses of nursing home residents. For single individuals, they are usually less useful. An immediate annuity, in its simplest form, is a contract with an insurance company under which the consumer pays a certain amount of money to the company and the company sends the consumer a monthly check for the rest of his or her life.

Medicare's Limited Nursing Home Coverage

Medicare Part A covers institutional care in hospitals and skilled nursing facilities, as well as certain care given by home health agencies and care provided in hospices.Any person who has reached age 65 and who is entitled to Social Security benefits is eligible for Medicare Part A without charge. That is, there are no premiums for this part of the Medicare program.

Using a Prepaid Funeral Contract to Spend Down Assets for Medicaid

No one wants to think about his or her death, but a little preparation in the form of a prepaid funeral contract can be useful. In addition to helping your family after your death, a prepaid funeral contract can be a good way to spend down assets in order to qualify for Medicaid.

Social Security Disability Benefits (SSDI)

Disability benefits are available to qualified recipients under two programs, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Income (SSDI). SSI is a means-tested program for people with disabilities who have very limited means, but SSDI is an insurance program that is available to qualified workers with disabilities regardless of their resources. As of November 2014, some 10.9 million disabled workers and their dependents were receiving SSDI benefits from Social Security.

Talking to Millennials About Your Senior Living Choices Long Before You Need Them

If you’re over 50, chances are you’ve thought about moving your parents into a senior living community. If you’re under 30 or a minority, however, you may actually be less likely to consider this option for your parents. Those were among the findings of a recent survey commissioned by Caring.com, in which respondents were asked whether they’d ever consider senior living either for their parents or for themselves.

New Rules Will Make It Harder to Qualify for Long-Term Care Help From the VA

The Veteran's Administration (VA) offers a pension benefit to low-income veterans (or their spouses) who are in nursing homes or who need help at home with everyday tasks like dressing or bathing. The pension, called Aid and Attendance, is currently underused, but impending regulations will soon make it available to even fewer veterans. The new regulations will for the first time specify asset limits for qualification and impose a look-back period and transfer penalties similar to Medicaid’s. The looming changes mean that those considering applying for Aid and Attendance should act quickly.